TATTOO REMOVAL

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If you regret having a particular tattoo or permanent makeup  – perhaps because it features the name of a now ex-partner or because the design no longer appeals to your tastes – then we are able to help. At Revolution Beauty Clinic we use only the most up-to-date and client-friendly processes. To that end we have invested in the latest Q switched Nd: YAG laser specifically to remove tattoos as efficiently and effectively as possible.

"How does the Q-Switched Nd: YAG Laser work?"
Previously lasers successfully removed tattoos but left an ugly scarred area in its place. Today our laser can specifically target the pigment in the ink; successfully break it down, and not affect the surrounding tissue.

The Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser works by targeting specific pigment in the skin, which TARGETS the damaged skin cells in the treatment area.

When it comes to laser tattoo removal, the Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser targets ink pigment and breaks it up into smaller particles through powerful bursts of energy. The ink is then absorbed into the bloodstream and eventually expelled from the body.

The Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser utilizes two energy frequencies; 1064 nanometers, to target deeper skin layers, and 532 nanometers, to address hyperpigmentation and more superficial layers.

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"How does Tattoo removal work?"
Laser tattoo removal is simple, safe, and produces fantastic results. The advanced technology works by allowing the light produced by the laser to pass through the skin and break up the tattoo ink into tiny particles. The body then disposes of these fragments via its immune system. It usually takes several treatment sessions to fully remove or just a couple to fade a tattoo in preparation for a cover-up, with regular intervals between sessions.

"What happens after each treatment session?"
Immediately after treatment, there may be swelling, bruising or crusting and scabbing which can last up to 2 weeks. Some of the tattoo pigment is lost during this scabbing process. It is always advisable to follow the aftercare sheet handed to you.

"Can you fade a tattoo with laser tattoo removal before a tattoo cover-up?"
Sometimes yes, but not everything can be covered well. If you only want to fade a tattoo ready for a new tattoo cover-up, you may need just 2-3 sessions over say 2-3 months, depending on what you want to cover it with. A new light-colored tattoo will need more of the old tattoo removed than if you plan a new dark tattoo to cover the old one. Some tattoos require a little help from the laser in preparation for cover-up, with a far superior result. A cover-up tattoo should always look good in its 
own right. Beware of promises to “cover it with black”. You may end up with a worse tattoo than the original. Even the best cover-ups are rarely 100% effective. If the original tattoo was very dark and strong it may seep back through in time.

"How many treatments will I need?"
A series of 6 or more treatments are needed for optimal results.  Depending on the color of the tattoo, how recent it is, and the depth that the ink sits in the skin, this will affect how many treatments you may need.

"Can things go wrong with laser tattoo removal?"
The right equipment in the right hands makes laser treatment very safe but just like everything in life, there are some risks. The risks are generally rare or else we wouldn’t be doing the treatment! This is one reason why patch testing (trying the laser on a small part of the tattoo) when you have your initial assessment is so important.

Skin color change: Laser treatment affects the natural pigment molecules (called melanin) in the skin and can sometimes cause a lightening effect (hypopigmentation) on the area of skin treated. This is rarely permanent. More common is a slight temporary darkening of the skin following treatment. Again this is usually temporary but rarely either effect can be permanent.

Tattoo color change: Occasionally the pigments used in the tattoo, particularly iron oxides which are used in red, pink, and white may actually darken when hit with the laser. This darkening may be removed by more laser treatment or it may be permanent.

Scarring: On a microscopic level the laser does cause temporary damage to the skin. The body repairs this damage as it would any skin injury. Occasionally it will repair this damage with more scar tissue than normal and there may be some minor textural changes to the skin or more rarely visual scarring. If there is already scarring within the tattoo the laser treatment will not remove this but will
remove the tattoo ink. Very rarely the body may react to any skin injury by producing a much thicker, bulkier scar tissue called a hypertrophic scar or even a scar known as a keloid scar. If you have had this response before you may be at greater risk of further keloid scar formation and should think very carefully about having any laser treatment.

Infection: Infection is highly unlikely if you’ve kept the area clean and dry afterward but if you feel your skin in the few days post-treatment is getting redder or hotter or sorer then you may have an infection, that can be treated with antibiotics.

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